Category Archives: Mystery Technique

Mystery Technique

Mystery Technique #65

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Want to know what special tools I used to paint this? You can find out next month if you’ve signed up for email updates!

 

ANSWER TO MYSTERY TECHNIQUE #64:

Here’s my Japanese paperweight in action!

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Although these are typically used to keep lightweight papers from shifting during delicate brushwork, mine help me manipulate how the paper buckles. I like to work with lots of water on unstretched paper, which makes the paper form hills and valleys that evaporate at different rates. The patterns preserved in the paint remind me of the traces water leaves behind in the landscape.

Mystery Technique

Mystery Technique #64

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I bought this handy tool years ago; want to know what is and how it helps me paint? You can find out next month if you’ve signed up for email updates!

 

ANSWER TO MYSTERY TECHNIQUE #63:

Both #62 and #63 use white fluid acrylic paint and part of a thin plastic bag to create texture. Last time, I put the white layer down first; this time, I started with a wet-in-wet layer of blue-gray with a little magenta. After it dried, I got the paper wet again and applied the diluted white on top of the dark layer. I then pressed part of a thin plastic bag onto the wet paint and manipulated the wrinkles in the plastic to vary the shapes. After the paint dried, I peeled off the plastic.

 

Mystery Technique

Mystery Technique #63

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What’s the connection between this month’s technique and Mystery Technique #62? You can find out next month if you’ve signed up for email updates!

 

 

ANSWER TO MYSTERY TECHNIQUE #62:

 
I started by applying white fluid acrylic paint to wet watercolor paper. Next I pressed part of a thin plastic bag onto the wet surface, manipulating the wrinkles in the plastic to make varied shapes. After the paint dried, I peeled off the plastic and glazed it with thin wet-in-wet watercolor washes. While the watercolor soaked into the white paper, it only stained the top of the white acrylic shapes, making it easy to lift and manipulate with a wet brush.